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Leading Women for Shared Parenting

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Location: Miami, FL 33128, USA


On May 10, 2013 a group of prominent women unveiled a new organization calling for equally shared parenting as the guiding principle in family law policy and statutes. 

Leading Women for Shared Parenting debuted with an impressive list of supporters.  From writers, to researchers to legislators and numerous female attorneys, the organization is demonstrating shared parenting is supported across multiple sectors of society. 

The group's initial public effort centers on an electronic campaign to endorse a broad policy statement supporting Shared Parenting.  LW4SP anticipates thousands of women will show their support for shared parenting by electronically signing the online statement. 

Prior to its public launch, 19 women from LW4SP sent a group letter to Florida Governor Rick Scott urging him to sign the bill on his desk containing shared parenting language.

Leading Women for Shared Parenting is an organization whose supporters recognize Children Need Both Parents. 

Leading Women for Shared Parenting was founded to dispel the widespread myth that it is only - or even mainly - disgruntled fathers with limited access to their children who promote equal shared parenting as the default model for separating parents.
That is simply not the truth.

Polls in the United States, Canada and other western countries consistently demonstrate overwhelming support in the general population for equally shared parenting. Both fair-minded men and women across all social and cultural lines understand that mothers and fathers are equally important in the lives of their children.

Here's a Leading Women for Shared Parenting hub and spoke illustration of issues stemming from a lack of Shared Parenting.
For some years a number of prominent women in media and politics have been championing this issue in the public forum of ideas and in policy-making circles. Eventually they sought a common platform from which they could bring their support for equal shared parenting to effective attention and positive legislative action.
Thus LW4SP came into being, with more than 150 influential women lending their names in support of the equal shared parenting principle.
Early and eager supporters of the concept included a number of well known women. 
Barbara Kay, an award winning Canadian journalist and columnist with the National Post signed on immediately.
Dr. Linda Nielsen, Wake Forest University social scientist, expressed support and offered a number of  positive suggestions.
Molly Olson, Founder of the Center for Parental Responsibility and a long time advocate for equality based improvements in family law came aboard. 
Phyllis Schalfly, Founder of Eagle Forum and a woman Time Magazine named as one of the 100 Most Influential Women of the 20th Century, joined enthusiastically.  
Early supporters also included: Maryland Delegate Jill CarterKris Titus of the Canadian Equal Parenting Council,  and Jill Egizii of the Parental Alienation Awareness Organization USA.
Others Include:

We only support organizations who show an understanding that children need both parents, and that either parent is equally capable of the choice to perpetrate hate or declare peace.

Children's Rights




A new group is emerging that may finally change the way Family Courts treat mothers and fathers. Currently, the default in most states is to award the lion's share of the time with the children to mothers, and require the father to pay child support. This is unfair to fathers, and has resulted in massive abuses within the system, leading to fathers committing suicide and being imprisoned. A new organization I am a part of, Leading Women for Shared Parenting, seeks to remedy this inequality by having women and mothers speak up in favor of shared parenting. When legislators realize that women themselves are in favor of reversing this bias, they should finally change the laws to make the default a presumption of 50/50 equally shared custody.
Fathers' rights organizations have tried for years to change the status quo, but have not quite pulled it off, no doubt due to the growing stigma against men in society. They have been marginalized by being called sore losers and deadbeats who only want to lower their child support.
Continually, between 78 and 87 percent of both men and women support shared parenting – and there is no statistical difference between the sexes. Dr. William Fabricius, an Associate Professor of Psychology of at Arizona State University, discovered these results when polling residents in Pima County, Arizona. He also found that polls taken in Canada and a vote in Massachusetts revealed very similar results. But sadly, Fabricius writes, “there is a very sizable gap between current popular views strongly favoring equal custody, as reflected in polls and votes on custody allocation, and actual legal outcomes.”
The reason we don't have shared parenting is because it's a big business. Family law attorneys make too much money off the years of legal fighting, and the state bar associations help their own keep their greedy claws controlling the system by lobbying state legislatures to oppose shared parenting bills.
There is significant research showing that shared parenting is best for kids. There are over three dozen medical studies which indicate that shared parenting arrangements – joint decision-making and near-equal parenting time – provide the best outcomes for children. The studies also reveal that parenting time of every other weekend, commonly ordered by judges, is harmful to children.

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